Reflection

Before we resume celebrating, I’d like to make a personal note of apology to Erica C. Barnett, Josh Feit, the Sierra Club, and all other friends of light rail that advocated the defeat of Proposition 1 in 2007  I underestimated the wisdom of the region’s voters, and thought it foolish to hold out for a better package.  I thought the road measures were a critical sweetener to win suburban and exurban votes.

It took a lot of work to make my judgment wrong and theirs right, but that verdict remains true nonetheless.  In particular, I’d like to thank the Sound Transit staff, Mayor Nickels, Snohomish County Executive Aaron Reardon, my blogging colleagues, and everyone who worked, volunteered, or donated to the campaign.  This is your victory.  Savor it.

About Martin H. Duke

Martin joined the blog in Fall 2007 and became Editor-in-Chief in 2009. He is originally from suburban DC, but has lived in the Greater Seattle area since 1997. He resides with his family in Columbia City and works as a software engineer in Lower Queen Anne.




Comments

  1. I was at the Pike and Broadway celebration last night, and I made a particular note of high-fiving anyone else I saw who was wearing a Mass Transit Now sticker. We did it!

  2. You know, I was thinking the same thing…I have to admit, this is a better bill than what we had in 2007.

    • I don’t agree. I think what we had in 2007 was better, mostly because I actually supported and wanted the roads portion.

      • John Jensen says:

        Funding road expansion through a sales tax? Not for me. I liked the new HOV lanes and attacking some choke points, but not many of the new GP lines.

        I like the 2008 plan because it’s so much faster. It means Seattle expansion can happen faster. Note how North King got the same amount of rail? It means we got the same amount of rail for cheaper in Seattle.

      • There weren’t many GP lanes. I agree about the sales tax thing, but what other options do we have?

        We can always oppose anything here by say “sales tax sux”. What are the other options?

      • John Jensen says:

        I think there were too many GP lanes. The cross-base highway in particular. http://blog.carlessinseattle.us/2007/10/a-second-look-a.html I mean, it’s done and said, right? We still have to replace 520, add HOV to I-90, replace those collapsing structures, and fix the obvious choke points.

        So, how do we do that? Well, I advocate for tolling on corridors you’re going to spend billions on and raising the gas tax. Yep, politically unpopular, but so is raising the sales tax. Or, let’s get a billion from the democrat’s public works bill that’ll be passed in a few weeks.

      • John Jensen says:

        Oh, and I very much hate to say this since both Rossi and Eyman support it… I’d have some percentage of car sales tax revenue go to roads (and transit). A lot of states do this.

      • Ben Schiendelman says:

        What are the options is a silly question. For transit, there really isn’t another option. For roads – how about some MVET, eh?

      • Ben Schiendelman says:

        I sure didn’t. We don’t need road expansion anymore. VMT has decreased this year, and it will decrease again.

  3. I’ll add my “me, too!” I’m ecstatic to have been wrong.

  4. I’m sorry too. This proposition was way better than last years and no roads! Thanks to everyone who made this happen.

  5. John Jensen says:

    I think this is a better plan than last year’s, absolutely. Martin’s also right when he said it took a lot of work to get it on the ballot this year.

    I also want to thank the Snohomish County Sound Transit board members. Pushing for light rail to Lynnwood with a 15 year plan was the right move.

  6. I want to extend my sincere thanks to all the members of the Seattle Transit Blog. Your efforts were an important part of getting Prop. 1 passed. Seattle is a better city for your efforts, and future generations owe you a debt of gratitude.

    Yay Team Transit!

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