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  • RossB on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downI agree with what you are saying, Mike, but the point I'm making is that even when Link gets to Lynnwood -- hell, even when it gets to Ballard -- there will still be lots and lots of buses that go through downtown. They may have different numbers, they may have letters instead, but there will still be huge number carrying people from much of Seattle. Focusing on the actually route numbers was just a shorthand (and somewhat smart-ass) way of making my point. What matters is the number per hour, especially during peak. Page 13 of that same document...
  • Bryce Kolton on Seattle Transit Advisory Board Members: No on I-976Correction! This was not written nor endorsed by the Seattle Transit Advisory Board. This was written by Alex and me, two citizens who happen to be serving as members to the board. The Seattle Transit Advisory Board does not hold an opinion, official nor otherwise on I-976, and has been working to prepare to help King County Metro and other transportation agencies to enforce the will of the voters, whatever the results. (As a private citizen though, "No!" to I-976!) Bryce Kolton
  • Brad on News Roundup: EllenI don't know if I'd call it racist. There are plenty of trashy white criminals. The majority in fact.
  • Paul on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downHow much of the loss in ridership on the ST550 is due to the loss of riders who used it as a shuttle between downtown tunnel stops? Before the buses left the tunnel if you were riding between the International District and Westlake station you would just hop on the available vehicle, bus or train. And since the ST550 ran all day it is logical that it was used a lot for this purpose.
  • RossB on Why ridership on ST 550 melted down@Al -- The point I'm making is that lights generally favor north-south travel. I'm not suggesting extra signal priority -- I'm saying it isn't needed. Take a cab at 3:00 in the morning from Yesler to Denny. Take your pick in terms of a street. Just for fun, ask the cab driver to stop every quarter mile, next to a bus stop, and wait there for a few seconds. My guess is you get there in around 6, maybe 8 minutes at most. Of course it would be faster if you were underground. But that just isn't going to happen....
  • RossB on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downYeah, and it wouldn't even be that much lost capacity on Fourth. Right now, there already is a bus lane on Fourth (https://goo.gl/maps/SfZm5XZMLvcUjWw36). So you basically lose one lane of general purpose traffic. That seems like a very small price to pay. General purpose lanes have been converted to BAT/Bus lanes on Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and now Sixth. A lane on Second was converted to a bike path. We are trying to take a lane each direction on First (for the streetcar). Taking a lane on Fourth, and then opening up some other streets seems like a net win...
  • Tom Terrific on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downI hadn't thought of using the west-to-south cloverleaf, so maybe it would work. Breaching the divider for buses wouldn't work, though, because they'd be on the west side of four lane Rainier; the turn would be too close ti move across traffic to it. That said, they might be able to get over by Massachusetts which has a light, turn left there then right on 21st and right on Rainier. The diagonal layout of Rainier means one less turn than normal for a reversing loop. Maybe a temporary signal that can be activated by the bus could be added at...
  • Tom Terrific on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downBernie, I doubt anyone here would object to having representation based more on ridership and less on arbitrary political boundaries. That said, what most people are opposed is "direct election" because you then get completely unqualified people on the board. You don't think there'd be an "ST Board Member from Cement" and one from "Steel". There'd be one from "Construction" as well. Or more. Yes, "Labor" could probably elect a couple of seat, but Holy Mary Mother of God, the opportunities for graft would be stupendous!!!!! At least the people of whom the Board is comprised have shown the ability...
  • Tom Terrific on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downMaybe the "fix" for what you mention, Al -- the lights will be synchonized the "wrong" way for the buses -- is to not make the lanes contraflow and to put cobble barriers between the GP lanes and the bus lanes. That's a pretty strong deterrent to most drivers, much more than even red paint. Just disallow right turns across the bus lanes. If you need to go "right" after you have been driving on Third or Fourth, you make three lefts or use First, Second, Fifth or Sixth. I really do like Ross's idea of a two-street transit mall,...
  • Tom Terrific on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downRoss, OK. Third south is much easier to accommodate bus-wise. That means buses south on Fourth (westside stops) and north on Third (eastside stops). The buses would get Prefontaine while auto traffic would continue a block down Third South to Second Avenue Extension south of Yesler. There would be turning conflicts at Fourth/Prefontaine/Washington between the buses, but since they would only be buses, it shouldn't be too bad. If Third eventually becomes three lanes only then the single southbound lane simply won't carry much traffic, making two adjacent streets one-way the same way less crazy. So, yeah, it sounds like...
  • Al S. on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downI’m afraid you don’t understand Ross. With a two-way operation and small blocks, there cannot be any realistic transit priority. The push for all-door boarding and paid fare areas also reduces dwell time at stops. Signal delay thus becomes a big factor in creating slow buses on Third Avenue. Maybe if you rode buses in Downtown LA you would see the difference.
  • Bernie on News Roundup: EllenRossB got this 100% right. Don't like it... impeach him!
  • asdf2 on News Roundup: EllenThe actual usefulness of a bus intercept to Mercer Island residents depends on how the schedules work out. For all-day, bi-directional service, it problem makes the most sense overall for the Eastgate/Issaquah route to connect to Link at South Bellevue P&R, rather than Mercer Island. A Mercer Island intercept means a more direct route to Seattle. But a South Bellevue intercept means a more direct route to Bellevue and Redmond. While more people would be going to Seattle than Bellevue/Redmond, the time savings from a South Bellevue intercept for Bellevue/Redmond is much more than the time savings for a Mercer...
  • Andy Stevens on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downI’d consider 3rd a bus corridor. The bus tunnel was also one.
  • Frank Chiachiere on Podcast #84: Like a ripe avocadoIt looks like there was a link missing, it should be showing up now. sorry for the inconvenience.
  • A Joy on News Roundup: EllenI too was confused by the "Ellen" title. I thought it an unusual contraction of "Election".
  • Mark Dublin on News Roundup: EllenThanks, Glenn. Now do I hear a second for Mike Lindblom getting a few days' instruction on 60' trolleybuses- in addition? But first things first. I think Sound Transit's every driver should be given enough time in the seat to be comfortable with both electric and diesel mode. Eleven AM straight through Downtown Gothenburg Sweden at the controls a 90' Italian streetcar wasn't my idea, but guess Västtrafik's chief instructor sent ahead for my records and decided that in the Norselands' warlike history, the town had faced worse threats to its parapets. Thrust of my request for universal training is...
  • Emily68 on News Roundup: EllenFor whatever it’s worth, the Twisp, WA town council has voted unanimously to recommend a NO vote on Eyman’s initiative. Twisp is about as red as they come.
  • RossB on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downIt is not a problem. First of all, no transit system, anywhere, moves people quickly through downtown. Most of the time is spent loading and unloading passengers. Even if you have really good dwell times (15 seconds, for example) that will take up the bulk of your time, because the stop spacing is close. But this is as it should be. Too many people want to be 1/4 mile down the road. If downtown Seattle was huge -- if it was Manhattan, for example -- then express type service (skipping a few stops) would make sense. But we aren't. Even...
  • AndyL on News Roundup: EllenWhat I find particularly offensive are the statements about the intercept having “no clear benefits for Mercer Island residents.“ and “ Hay and Lippens both said they are fully supportive of light rail and excited to have a light rail station on the island, but they do not want a bus intercept or transfer station.” The intercept isn’t primarily designed for Mercer Island residents. It is to provide access to a station on a regional rail system paid for with regional tax dollars. It isn’t a private Mercer Island station and their position suggesting that thousands of riders should each...
  • Pete on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downDid the boardings account for what I would imagine a significant number of people (including me) that would grab whatever showed up in the bus tunnel while traveling just in the downtown area? I'd wait for a link train, but if the 550 showed up (running all day), I'd grab than instead of waiting. I don't see in the presentation if that was accounted for...
  • RossB on Why ridership on ST 550 melted downThanks for the correction Tom. Indeed.
  • RossB on News Roundup: EllenExactly. You aren't alone. I know a few people from Mercer Island, and they are smarter than this. Much of this just comes down to fear of change. That part I understand. If you live in Mercer Island, you aren't too eager to change things. I mean that in all sincerity. It is the land of professional athletes, and otherwise successful people that want to live in the 'burbs, but still stay close to the city. For the vast majority of them, it doesn't matter what happens close to the station. For a few -- like you -- it matters...
  • RossB on News Roundup: EllenNope -- I can't even vote in the race. Nor am I really that concerned. Other local races are more important, and even those are overshadowed by national or international races. What happens in Cameroon, for example, is far, far more important. What I find amusing are the folks that get their panties in a bunch because someone made a perfectly legitimate ad with a newspaper that has clearly seen better days. Most of all, I feel sorry for Mr. Savage. He is brilliant and heroic -- a first class civil rights leader in our midst, yet he has to...
  • Glenn in Portland on News Roundup: EllenPortland Tribune reporter and automotive fan gets to drive a MAX train.