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  • Bruce Englehardt on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationThe changes, if adopted, would take place in 2024, not 2021. The other trunk of the county's transit system (the I-5 corridor) already operates on a much larger skip-stop pattern, so it wouldn't affect the optics all that much.
  • Eric on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement report"I agree with the 24 hour delay, I absolutely do not want free fairs", "Free fairs, equals Greyhound therapy" Look, man, literally nobody here is proposing free fairs. We know we've gotta chip in to make sure the Clydesdales have a nice building to stay dry in, and Weird Al (presumably) isn't just gonna show up without a booking fee. And sure, the 4H Dogs may contain a Greyhound or two, but there are usually a lot of other cool puppers, floofs, and/or doggos too. And really, when you get down to it, the $10 or whatever it costs is...
  • Al S. on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationI would suggest that CT and Metro make a joint decision on routing between AVTC and Shoreline North/ 185th Station. What would seem to be most effective is for RapidRide E to follow the Alt B routing and for Swift to follow Alt A or Alt C, depending on where riders most need to go. That would also enable an in-direction transfer at 192nd between Swift and RapidRide at the same stop.
  • Mike Orr on Phase 2 Northgate Link Bus Network ProposalThe 45 can be seen as a northwest-southeast corridor, a complement to the grid. Lake City needs a counterpart to Ballard. That could conceivably make even Lake City-Fremont trips, Lake City-Wallingford trips, and Lake City-Geenwood trips shorter, not just those directly on the diagonal route. So it could end up having wider benefits than just those destinations along the diagonal route. Going from Lake City to Ballard via the U-District or 130th & Aurora may be excessively long and not the best network, even if it is grid-correct.
  • wanderer on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportBART has a tap on, tap off payment system. With faregates, it's pretty hard to accidentally miss the need to tap, though sometimes the gates malfunction. BART also has distance based fares. There's increasing pressure in the Bay Area to simplify fares. I think a simplified system could easily cause the problem Mike Orr noted--where short distance, urban riders are overcharged and long distance, suburban riders are undercharged. There are still substantial low income populations in Oakland and even San Francdisco.
  • Andy Sapuntzakis on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationI suggest picking A or C for the S/E-bound portion of the route, and B for the N/W-bound portion. That serves all the P&R and TC stops without crossing oncoming traffic lanes.
  • Mike Orr on Phase 2 Northgate Link Bus Network Proposal"I do wish they would combine the 45/62 into a full east-west route and force some people to deal with the one-stop Link ride." A grid is an ideal pattern but we mustn't take it too far. There's a real tradeoff between a 45/62 route and the predominant trip patterns. The mixed-use businesses and multifamily/rowhouse concentrations aren't distributed across linear grids like they are in San Francisco and Vancouver, where there are always people going from north Divisadero to Castro or from north Fillmore to south Fillmore for instance. Seattle has islands of urban villages in a vast sea of...
  • Mike Orr on Phase 2 Northgate Link Bus Network ProposalMetro published a list of routes at the beginning that it was considering for changes. The 271 would be part of an Eastside restructure, not a North Seattle restructure. Likewise, the 49 was left for an East Seattle restructure.
  • Mike Orr on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationAurora Village was more relevant when it was bigger. Now it's just Costco and a few hang-on stores and a P&R. Snohomish residents can go to Costco in Lynnwood. Shoreline/North Seattle residents have to go all the way to SODO, which is an hour or more away given the transfer waits and unreliability. The regional hubs were chosen with Link: Mountlake Terrace and 185th. At one point Shoreline was looking at moving the Aurora Village Transit Center and Link station to 192nd & Aurora but that option died. That would have separated the transit center from the shopping center, so...
  • Mike Orr on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationI've been uncertain about Aurora Village, but mostly I've thought Alternative A is best. Aurora Village is relevant to Shoreline residents, not so much to Snohomish residents. Lynnwood has a Costco on 99; Alderwood Mall is available, etc. The most important thing is a same-station stop for transferring between the E and Swift for trips like 85th to Edmonds CC.
  • Mike Orr on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street Station"Having a bus skip a rider at a bus stop is terrible optics for an operator!" Some of the confusion can be alleviated with distinct branding. Nobody expects Swift to serve all the 101 stops. The E, 5, 26, and 28 have different stop patterns on Aurora. The problem isn't having multiple distinct services on the same street; it's making the brands distinct enough that people don't expect one route to do the other. So Swift could have "Swift Express" or "Swift X" or "SuperSwift" or "Swifter" or something. Just don't call them plain Swift.
  • Mike Orr on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationPart of Swift's brand is that all buses serve all stops. The stops themselves are widely spaced so it's faster than a local bus but slower than an express. But its all-day frequency partly compensates for not being an express. It's like a subway that serves several selected stops -- always. There are subways with express overlays, short runs, and complex branches, but most of them don't. And this isn't NYC where comprehensive transit is the norm and express subways are a welcome addition: Snohomish County is just trying to establish an initial subway-like network in a community that has...
  • Jordan on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street Station@Al S: the sole purpose of Swift is to speed up service. It's closest thing to BRT we have in the state because of its express features and 100% off-board payment. Though I agree that riding patterns will likely shift with the arrival of Link 2024, continuous and uninterrupted service along Hwy 99 will still be needed. Just like along Aurora Ave, Rainier Ave or Pacific Hwy, there will still be strong demand from customers who need to solely travel along a portion of a corridor rather than transferring to a regional service at the end of the line.
  • Possibly Ignorant on Sunday Open Thread: How We Got Cul-de-sacsMill Creek is generally the epitome of suburbia planning hell, but they also have interconnected walking trails throughout the city, making it far more walking and biking friendly that it may appear from a quick glance at a map.
  • Mike Orr on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationWhat would be the problem? CT 105, PT 500, ST 574 all allow support trips within the non-core county. If you pay by ORCA it's no different than taking Metro and you get a transfer discount. The only downside is if you pay cash you can't get a transfer to Metro or Link.
  • Jordan on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationEeeexactly. What's gonna happen to Aurora Village is a key factor in how to route the Blue Line (Swift) . All of the current peak routes that currently operate from AVTC will be eliminated with Link 2024 and the 2 remaining local routes should ideally serve 185th. That leaves the E-line, which I hope Metro will exercise common sense and route it to 185th Station just as CT is doing with the Blue Line.
  • Al S. on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationYou make a good point, B! A transit center is created to serve a particular layout for a particular era in time, and a new high-frequency light rail line that stops a mile away but skips the transit center can render that transit center much more useless. I’ve noticed that many transit riders generally dislike any change that disrupts their comfortable understanding of a route structure. One only has to point to how Northgate TC will become much less relevant when Lynnwood Link opens and its function as a major regional shopping district fades. I think that it is still...
  • Mike Orr on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportUnderlying all this is how rare Everett-to-Tacoma trips are. Most people in Everett are going to Lynnwood, north Seattle, downtown Seattle, Bellevue, Redmond, Bothell, Kirkland, etc, not Tacoma or Lakewood. SeaTac is an outlier because of the airport, but it was built into Everett/Lynnwood Link planning assumptions. Other than Boeing workers, who goes from Federal Way/Pierce County to Lynnwood/Everett regularly? Who goes the other way? There are all kinds of jobs and shopping opportunities closer. So it's really only people going to grandmother's house for the weekend or Thanksgiving or occasionally visiting Tacoma or the like.
  • Mike Orr on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportThat's 105 minutes total, so still within the 120-minute transfer period. If you take Link and transfer to higher-priced Sounder, you'll pay the difference on Sounder and get a new 120-minute transfer window. If you start on a bus and transfer to higher-priced Link, you'll get the same thing. And only the tap-in points matter. So if your entire trip is 2-3 hours but your last tap-in is within two hours of your starting point, then you'll pay only a single fare for the entire trip. That would cover Richmond Beach to Lakewood for instance. The last tap-in is at...
  • RDPence on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationThat merits a close look, Donde. I use the Aurora Village TC regularly. There's a traffic light at the exit drive, for safe ped crossing, and traffic on S. 200th is modest. Alternative B is definitely the preferred choice, unless CT and Metro choose to abandon the TC altogether and route all those existing local routes to a Link station.
  • Mike Orr on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportDoes "constant line" mean 5-10 people every bus run? That may happen in unusual circumstances but it sounds exaggerated. On medium-to-high-volume routes I see 0-2 non-payers at each boarding. On low-volume routes I see few boardings, period, so there may be 0-2 non-payers on the entire run. (Does "run" mean end-to-end one time, or all the trips in a bus shift? I meant the former here.)
  • B on Community Transit studies connections from Swift to Link at 185th Street StationHow relevant is the Aurora Village TC going to be as a regional, inter-county bus hub, after Lynnwood Link? Is serving Aurora Village via Highway 99 sufficient for the Village "as a destination?" My take on this: Swift follows option A, and the E either stops where it does now or if possible is extended to MLT Link station via the Gateway development (but only IF there enough busses and drivers to do this and maintain the current frequency!). That way same direction transfers between E and Swift can happen without having to cross Highway 99 and without having to...
  • Mike Orr on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportIn IT's case fares paid 2% of costs. In Metro's case it's approx. 20-30%. In Link's case it's higher, maybe around 50-70%.
  • Mike Orr on Sound Transit presents initial fare enforcement reportAnother issue is the size difference between communities. Everett Transit wants a lower fare than the other agencies. Community Transit and Pierce Transit can't charge as much as Metro for local routes because those suburban communities won't tolerate it. Their costs are less because their services are less, and they don't have the density to support as much service as Metro. And their constituents are more car-oriented and only want a little transit, not something with high fares and taxes.