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  • Al S. on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefThe train vehicle manufacturers are even looking at vehicle technology in a single vehicle that can be driverless on some segments with drivers in other segment. In that instance, separate OMFs would not be needed. Here is one of Alstom’s pages — “Autonomous rail: The Future of Rail Is Automated” https://www.alstom.com/autonomous-mobility-future-rail-automated
  • Daniel Thompson on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI agree Jim on the union issue. The Bush/Cheney wing of the Republican Party was all about destroying labor by destroying unions and immigration to lower labor costs. Ironically the shortage of workers due in part to fewer undocumented and so lower paid immigrants has been an uptick in unionization. But the workers I represent tend to be social conservatives, and they think the progressives (as opposed to what they thought were once Democrats) have gone over the edge. Seattle to them is the end of times. They also oppose the desire of progressives to use government to control every...
  • Jim Cusick on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI am one. I'm a union member. Republicans don't give a shit about union members. I've been a white-collar worker, too. I've been on both sides. Sometimes, 'those people' are their own worst enemies.
  • Daniel Thompson on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI represent blue collar workers. By and large they are very conservative. Some are VERY conservative.
  • Daniel Thompson on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage relief"Most of America took a different path. Modern cities as well as parts of cities were built through a combination of automobile-based zoning and large-scale automobile-based infrastructure development. This was not based on individual choice." I agree Ross the automobile spawned the suburbs, but disagree that is/was not based on individual choice, both to drive and where to live. As soon as the car was invented and available folks started leaving the urban cities. There are many multi-family zones and urban zones in this area. For example, in my city of Mercer Island we have both. With our real-estate prices...
  • AJ on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage relief"IMO transit needs to “re-urbanize” because urban density is the one place transit can compete with cars because of the natural congestion and short travel distances, and higher number of poor riders. Instead we are building a 90-mile spine ST will not be able to afford to operate at reasonable frequencies, at least outside the urban core." I think Dan makes a good point here that if a key goal of transit is the avoid the pollution of SOVs, with widespread adoption of EVs the importance of transit in low density suburbs goes down, and the de-urbanization of jobs via...
  • Jim Cusick on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI only have problems with blue-collar workers who vote Republican.
  • Cam Solomon on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI think this has much more to do with the demographic shifts, aging of the population and squeezing to a trickle immigration at the borders. While I am all for giving more respect to the trades (not to mention more cold hard cash) I'm not sure how more respect would fix the problem.
  • tacomee on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefNice link! Worth reading after all the posts in this thread. The problem with Greater Seattle, (and every other Liberal city in America) is a deep seated disrespect for blue collar workers. Problems with affordable housing, transit, the homeless and the overall shabbiness of the City are all unsolvable at this point because there just aren't enough blue collar workers actually fix things. Here's a quick list of worker shortages that derail "the Liberal agenda" in Greater Seattle. 1. Transit service levels are 100% controlled by operator shortages. 2. The residential constriction industry in Seattle has a maximum output of...
  • Daniel Thompson on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefBoth Sam. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-07-20/america-s-bus-driver-shortage-has-left-transit-systems-in-crisis A long-term lack of drivers (due to an aging workforce, and pay and working conditions in urban cities along with the cost of living in those cities that turn off younger workers) will force transit systems to prioritize transit service. The looming operations funding shortfall from fewer riders, lower fare paying percentages, and increased costs will also require focusing transit service (and reduce the number of drivers transit systems can hire even if available, and the amount they pay the drivers). The loss of the work commuter will make it difficult to pass operations levies if the...
  • RossB on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefSeattle is booming. The idea that it is in decline is just absurd. I get it though. You walk around and see so many homeless and freak out. You see sketchy parts of Seattle and assume it is caused by economic decline. It must be something new, some signal that Seattle is dying. It isn't. As this article points out, downtown has been sketchy for over a century -- it just moves around. The only way to really solve the problem is to create a bigger social safety net, and that would likely require a national commitment. Basically we would...
  • Sam on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefIs there a transit labor shortage, or an over-allocation of transit service? "Comment section Sam is America's leading transit thinker." - The New York Times
  • AJ on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefYes, primarily because that will be the location of the OMF-S, and combined with the county border it makes for a clean opportunity to change modes ... though I suppose the entirety of TDLE could be built using the new mode, if regular Link still had access to OMF-S. Al's point has been that a max higher speed on eLink would be far more relevant on the few segments with long stop spacing, and SFW (342nd) to Fife would be a prime example (hence why TDLE mileage is ~50% in KC but 3/4 stations are in Pierce). Additionally, smaller, autonomous...
  • RossB on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefEuclidean zoning or single-use zoning is a fairly modern concept. It grew from a combination of increased racial tension and the automobile in America. The former is not that important in this context, but the latter is. For centuries it was standard practice to work in the same neighborhood as you lived -- often the same place. This is the way that cities evolved. Ghent -- being an old city -- evolved that way. There was no central planning, no attempt to concentrate uses, it just happened willy-nilly -- "organically", if you will. Ghent is not alone. Older cities --...
  • Cam Solomon on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI see what you are saying. You are suggesting they build just 1 station for TDLE, to 356th. Then after that e-Link?
  • Cam Solomon on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefNot sure what South Federal Way Station is, but the Federal Way transit center (S 320th St) is about 5 miles from the county line, and Tacoma Dome is about 6 miles from the county line. Is 320th where you were proposing the transfer? Functionally, that's 50/50, and I suspect it would perform a useful function for far more King County residents that Pierce County residents. I've taken transit to Federal Way exactly once from Tacoma, to visit a friend within biking distance of the Transit Center. There is nothing in Federal Way that couldn't be had, much better in...
  • AJ on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefI was proposing the mode change/transfer point at South Federal Way station, so I would consider that functionally all within Peirce. Not sure where you get 50% in King?
  • Cam Solomon on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefWhy 100% when half of it would be in King County? And it would be used substantially, likely by the majority, by people coming from South King, with it's lack of amenities and jobs, to Tacoma? Look, Tacoma (I won't even bother pretending by saying Pierce, because the rest of Pierce is going to be 99.4% car-dependent/obsessed for the next 50 years at least) needs local transit. It needs it frequent. It needs it reliable. And it needs at least a limited grid to be separated from car traffic and therefore competitive with driving. Until we have those things, Tacoma...
  • AJ on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefHere's a elegant solution to the "OMF" problem. 1. Extend Link to South Federal Way and build OMF-S as-proposed. OMF-S can serve both Link and eLink fleets. Build the rest of TDLE for eLink operations. 2. Build OMF-N as-proposed and extend Link to Ash Way or 99/Highway (there are alternatives at both locations, currently). Build the rest of Everett Link for eLink operations. Here I use "eLink" as a catch-all term for a shorter, faster, automated vehicle, as a nod to eBart's 'extension with a new mode.' I'm assuming eLink trains will have identical gauge as Link, so even it...
  • Tom Terrific on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefP.S. My point is: don't build it at all. Stop at Federal Way and Lynnwood and never lay another track. If there is to be in-city rail, let it be Citidis Trams and let the City build it all at-grade (except possibly a bit of tunnel through Lower Queen Anne) and run it itself. ST cannot do a decent job of it.
  • Tom Terrific on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefHow are you going to move automated trains from their little stubs to the central MF's?
  • Al S. on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefTom, the Central OMF will end up serving West Seattle and Ballard no matter what. North OMF will also serve north to Everett and South OMF will serve south to Tacoma. So ST could build another Central OMF for West Seattle and Ballard in SODO and forgo North OMF, or convert Central OMF for automated trains (almost certainly using the same track gauge) and build North OMF. The cost is much less than building giant Link stations everywhere. But the larger cost of not changing technologies is with operations. Drivers are well over half of the costs of operating light...
  • Tom Terrific on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefAl, you can't have dangling stubs of an alternative technology hanging from the spine like icicles on a Christmas tree. Every one would need its own Maintenance Facility. There goes madness.
  • Tom Terrific on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefHey, I'm not the one who's advocating for the end of SFH zoning. If you weren't a newbie, you would have read my paeans to putting lining the crests of the north-south ridges with medium rises, creating tens of thousands of new, hot view properties and allowing the SFH neighborhoods on the hillsides and flats between to remain securely ensconced in amber. Forever. All the ridges except the one on which South Seattle College sits have an arterial along the ridge which would have frequent service. Alas, nobody agrees so I shut up. I am offended that you lectured me...
  • Al S. on Sound Transit’s 2023 service plan shows no signs of labor shortage reliefThat’s just it, Mike. They don’t have to be extensions! They can be. cross-platform transfers. There is no way that the North Seattle Subway’s vision can be affordable. As a matter of fact, I’m pretty convinced that an automated Ballard-West Seattle line (a long proven technology — just ask Vancouver) can be built much cheaper than Ruth Link technolog. It could then open sooner as we wouldn’t have to wait for the bonding capacity. The typical Seattle approach is vision before analysis. The two should be in tandem like the rest of the world. It’s how we got stuck with...