UPDATE Below.

We don’t have the precinct maps yet, but I found the breakdown of Proposition 1 votes by legislative district on the King County Website.  Semi-official illustrator of STB Oranviri generated this map for your viewing pleasure:

Note that the results apply to the King County portions of the districts only; in many cases only a fraction of the district was eligible to vote on the measure.

The results, in tabular form, are below the jump.  A big pat on the back to the 36th district (Ballard, Magnolia, Belltown) who supported Prop 1 overwhelmingly, despite those neighborhoods largely not being served by light rail.

District % Yes Neighborhoods/Cities
43rd        80.93      UW, Ravenna, Wallingford, Fremont, Capitol Hill, Downtown Seattle
36th        71.00      Ballard, Magnolia, Belltown
46th        68.76      Laurelhurst, Lake City, Northgate, Greenwood
37th        68.41      Madrona, Rainier Valley, NW Renton
County Aggregate 61.65%
32nd       60.04      Shoreline, Lake Forest Park, Kenmore
34th        59.36      West Seattle/Burien
48th        57.30      Medina, DT Kirkland, Redmond, North Bellevue, East Bellevue
45th        57.28      Woodinville, N. Kirkland, N. Redmond
41st        56.57      South & West Bellevue (incl. DT), Newcastle
1st          55.42      Bothell
5th          53.37      Issaquah, Sammamish
33rd        52.90      Seatac, Kent, Des Moines, Normandy Park
11th        52.87      Sodo, Georgetown, Tukwila, Renton
30th        51.61      Federal Way, Algona, Pacific
47th        48.06      Auburn
31st        46.66      Auburn, Algona

UPDATE: Oran created a new map that edits out the areas not in the ST district.  The numbers are the YES percentage, rather than the district number.

19 Replies to “Partial Prop. 1 Vote Breakdown”

      1. Not nearly as much as the east side and up north. I’m on Queen Anne (also the 43rd) and don’t get anything out of it for my neighborhood. Those downtown and in the UW will now be able to go to Bellevue or Northgate, but it’s not like they weren’t getting light rail already.

        I think it more has to do with general mindset. If you live in a dense area already, you’re probably less likely to believe that the answer to our problems is more cars.

  1. It was definitely my efforts at the Broadway Farmer’s Market that brought it from 80.92% to 80.93%.

      1. I was out canvassing with ericn. What was really funny was that our voter sheet listed the household of a prominent engineer who contributed technical analysis to the “No to Prop 1” campaign. We ran out of time before we got to his house.

        I think the signs I put up at the park & ride and my yard helped in the 1st District.

  2. I’m so proud of the 34th that includes Burien. 59%! We don’t get much from Prop 1, but we sure helped get it passed! Shows how forward thinking the “West Side” is :)

  3. Hmmm

    I wonder if you could get a break down for Snohomish and Pierce Counties? Prop 1 passed in Snohomiah County but failed in Pierce albeit barely.

  4. Final legislative and precinct numbers are due in early January. When they come out, transit supporters need to thank the precious few legislators who supported Prop 1 this year – and remind the anti’s just how out of step they are with their own district.

    That means:

    Frank “freeways forever” Chopp
    Judy “light rail over my dead body” Clibborn
    Deborah “I’ve always got a better idea” Eddy
    Mary Margaret “they’re putting WHAT on my bridge” Haugen

    I’m sure there were plenty more Eastside Kempercrats who played their own games with fading freeway dreamin’, but those were the few Dems I’ve been following since Olympia’s RTID debacle last year. Suburban Democratic wimps will forever be trying to find new ways of steering transit dollars into their local chambers’ pet freeway projects. Don’t let ’em do it. And find some real Democrats to run against them next time. And tell the environmental groups you belong to that they should stop funding sell-out Democrats-in-name-only.

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