C-curb in action
C-curb in action

We all heard about the c-curb madness. A few weeks back. (Our very own Oran has a great photo gallery on Flickr of the intersection in question. It’s worth a view.)

And it sank in a little bit: Light rail means more than some temporary changes and construction delays, it means an altering of our city.

Mostly this alteration is a good thing: Less emissions, less crowded buses, more options. But in other cases, change can be frustrating. Sometimes you lose free parking opportunities in another neighborhood from your own. Sometimes you get wires in the way of your view. Sometimes you can’t make a left turn into a gas station. And, you know, any change will end up frustrating at least one person used to the time before.

My neighborhood, Capitol Hill, has seen its own share of changes because of light rail. But on the other end of it, once we’re used to these changes and annoyances and benefits and efficiencies, the city is going to be better off. Light rail opens in seventeen hours and twenty minutes.

9 Replies to “17 Hours: Recent Light Rail Consternation”

  1. I had lunch today on Beacon Hill. I took the from 36 from near Pioneer Square Station to Beacon Hill Station. It took 22 minutes. The return trip wasn’t any better, even worse. It took 23 minutes from BHS to PSS and a total of 27 minutes from BHS to Westlake. Both buses were crowded and hot. In comparison, Link will take only 9 minutes and a 5 minute walk. I’m looking forward to more lunch opportunities.

    We’re getting more U-Link construction workers having lunch at our Quiznos on Capitol Hill (yeah… I know what you’re thinking) which is helping to keep our business afloat. And we hope to serve more as construction ramps up.

    1. Taco bus on Rainier is now a realistic lunch possiblity from my office downtown, yum!

  2. Oran, which restaurant did you visit? How was it?

    And, yes, people ask me why the 36 wasn’t good enough for us all the time — well, the 36 is a fairly miserable experience. Link will be a huge improvement.

  3. July 18, 2009. The day the LRT opens for business. The day after Walter Cronkite dies, aged 92.

  4. Seattle finally joins the rest of the civilized world. Theres a quote made by William Barclay Parsons, back in 1900 who was the NYC Subway’s Chief Engineer. I find it suitable even today to describe what is happening with the re-birth of rail transportation in the United States. The Last sentance describes the situation exactly.

    “FOR NEW YORK THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A SOLUTION TO THE RAPID TRANSIT PROBLEM. BY THE TIME THE RAILWAY IS COMPLETED, AREAS THAT ARE NOW GIVEN OVER TO ROCKS AND GOATS WILL BE COVERED WITH HOUSES AND THERE WILL BE CREATED FOR EACH NEW LINE A SPECIAL TRAFFIC OF ITS OWN. THE INSTANT THAT THIS LINE IS FINISHED THERE WILL ARISE A DEMAND FOR OTHER LINES.”

    Now with the promotion of certain county executives to higher office, mabye we can see the rebirth of the waterfront streetcar, not only as a valuable transportation too but as very importaint mitigation for the alaskan way viaduct.

  5. “Sometimes you lose free parking opportunities in another neighborhood from your own.”

    It’s not just other people’s neighborhoods, people that live and/or work near the light rail are losing free parking in their own neighborhood. I feel sorry for the non-profit mentioned in the Seattle Times article that you linked who is losing free parking at their office, and all of their employees need their cars for their work, and the non-profit can’t afford to pay for parking passes. It’s another thing the employees of this non-profit (who I’m sure get paid low wages because come-on… they work for a non-profit) will have to pay for. Oh well, I guess it’s ok to sacrifice a non-profit out there trying to help the world, for the sake of the “greater good”.

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